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179(59) REVOKED Guidelines hazardous materials
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Guidelines for the development of the inventory of hazardous materials

  dd-mm-yyyy = Entry into force
DocumentMEPC/Res.179(59)17-07-2009
Revoked by  MEPC/Res.197(62)01-07-2011

179(59) Guidelines hazardous materials

Guidelines for the development of the inventory of hazardous materials

THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT PROTECTION COMMITTEE,

RECALLING Article 38(a) of the Convention on the International Maritime Organization concerning the functions of the Marine Environment Protection Committee conferred upon it by the international conventions for the prevention and control of marine pollution,


RECALLING ALSO that the International Conference on the Safe and Environmentally Sound Recycling of hips held in May 2009 adopted the Hong Kong International Convention for the Safe and Environmentally Sound Recycling of Ships, 2009 (the Hong Kong Convention) together with six Conference resolutions,


NOTING that regulations 5.1 and 5.2 of the Annex to the Hong Kong Convention require that ships shall have on board an Inventory of Hazardous Materials which shall be prepared and verified taking into account Guidelines, including any threshold values and exemptions contained in those Guidelines, developed by the Organization,


NOTING ALSO that regulation 5.3 of the Annex to the Hong Kong Convention requires that Part I of the Inventory of Hazardous Materials shall be properly maintained and updated throughout the operational life of the ship, taking into account the Guidelines developed by the Organization,


NOTING FURTHER that regulation 5.4 of the Annex to the Hong Kong Convention requires that the Inventory shall also incorporate Part II for operationally generated wastes and Part III for stores and shall be verified, taking into account the Guidelines developed by the Organization,


RECALLING that the International Conference on the Safe and Environmentally Sound Recycling of Ships, in its resolution 4, invited the Organization to develop Guidelines for global, uniform and effective implementation and enforcement of the relevant requirements of the Convention as a matter of urgency,


HAVING CONSIDERED, at its fifty-ninth session, the draft Guidelines for the development of the inventory of hazardous materials developed by the Working Group on Guidelines for Ship Recycling,

  1. ADOPTS the Guidelines for the development of the inventory of hazardous materials as set out in the Annex to this resolution;
  2. INVITES Governments to apply the Guidelines as soon as possible, or when the Convention becomes applicable to them; and 
  3. AGREES to keep the Guidelines under review.

Annex 01

01 Introduction

Introduction

1.1 Objectives of the Guidelines

These Guidelines provide recommendations for developing the Inventory of Hazardous Materials (hereinafter referred to as “the Inventory”) to assist compliance with regulation 5 (Inventory of Hazardous Materials) of the Hong Kong International Convention for the Safe and Environmentally Sound Recycling of Ships, 2009 (hereinafter referred to as “the Convention”).


1.2 Application of the Guidelines

These Guidelines have been developed to provide relevant stakeholders (e.g., shipbuilders, equipment suppliers, repairers, shipowners and ship management companies) with the essential requirements for practical and logical development of the Inventory.


1.3 Objectives of the Inventory

The objectives of the Inventory are to provide ship-specific information on the actual Hazardous Materials present on board, in order to protect health and safety and to prevent environmental pollution at Ship Recycling Facilities. This information will be used by the Ship Recycling Facilities in order to decide how to manage the types and amounts of materials identified in the Inventory of Hazardous Materials (regulation 9).

02 Definitions

Definitions

The terms used in these Guidelines have the same meaning as those defined in the Convention, with the following additional definitions which apply to these Guidelines only.

“Homogeneous material” means a material of uniform composition throughout that cannot be mechanically disjointed into different materials, meaning that the materials cannot, in principle, be separated by mechanical actions such as unscrewing, cutting, crushing, grinding and abrasive processes.

“Product” means machinery, equipment, materials and applied coatings on board a ship.

“Supplier” means a company which provides products; which may be a manufacturer, trader or agency.

“Supply chain” means the series of entities involved in the supply and purchase of materials and goods, from raw materials to final product.

“Threshold level” is defined as the concentration value in homogeneous materials.

03 Requirements for the inventory

Requirements for the Inventory

3.1 Scope of the Inventory

The Inventory consists of:

Part I: Materials contained in ship structure or equipment;
Part II: Operationally generated wastes; and
Part III: Stores.


3.2 Materials to be listed in the Inventory

Appendix 1 of the Guidelines, “Items to be listed in the Inventory of Hazardous Materials”, provides information on the Hazardous Materials that may be found on board a ship. Materials set out in appendix 1 should be listed in the Inventory. Each item in appendix 1 of these Guidelines is classified under “Table A”, “Table B”, “Table C” or “Table D” according to its properties:

  1. Table A comprises the materials listed in appendix 1 of the Convention;
  2. Table B comprises the materials listed in appendix 2 of the Convention;
  3. Table C (Potentially hazardous items) comprises items which are potentially hazardous to the environment and human health at Ship Recycling Facilities; and 
  4. Table D (Regular Consumable Goods potentially containing Hazardous Materials) comprises goods which are not integral to a ship and are unlikely to be dismantled or treated at a Ship Recycling Facility.

Table A and Table B correspond to Part I of the Inventory. Table C corresponds to Parts II and III and Table D corresponds to Part III.

3.3 Materials not required to be listed in the Inventory

Materials listed in Table B that are inherent in solid metals or metal alloys, provided they are used in general construction, such as hull, superstructure, pipes, or housings for equipment and machinery are not required to be listed in the Inventory.

3.4 Standard format of the Inventory of Hazardous Materials

The Inventory should be developed on the basis of the standard format set out in appendix 2 of these Guidelines: “Standard format of the Inventory of Hazardous Materials”. Examples of how to complete the Inventory are provided for guidance purposes only.

04 Requirements for development of the inventory

4 Requirements for development of the Inventory

4.1 Development of Part I of the Inventory for new ships


4.1.1 Part I of the Inventory for new ships should be developed at the design and construction stage.

4.1.2 Checking of materials listed in Table A
During the development of the Inventory (Part I), the presence of materials listed in Table A of appendix 1 should be checked and confirmed; the quantity and location of Table A materials should be listed in Part I of the Inventory. If such materials are used in compliance with the Convention, they should be listed in Part I of the Inventory. Any spare parts containing materials listed in Table A are required to be listed in Part III of the Inventory.


4.1.3 Checking of materials listed in Table B
If materials listed in Table B of appendix 1 are present in products above the threshold levels provided in Table B, the quantity and location of the products and the contents of the materials present in them should be listed in Part I of the Inventory. Any spare parts containing materials listed in Table B are required to be listed in Part III of the Inventory.


4.1.4 Process for checking of materials
The checking of materials as provided in paragraphs 4.1.2 and 4.1.3 above should be based on the “Material Declaration” furnished by the suppliers in the shipbuilding supply chain (e.g., equipment suppliers, parts suppliers, material suppliers).

4.2 Development of Part I of the Inventory for existing ships
In order to achieve comparable results for existing ships with respect to Part I of the Inventory, the following procedure should be followed.

The procedure is based on the following steps:

  1. collection of necessary information;

  2. assessment of collected information;

  3. preparation of visual/sampling check plan;

  4. onboard visual check and sampling check; and

  5. preparation of Part I of the Inventory and related documentation.

The determination of Hazardous Materials present on board existing ships should, as far as practicable, be conducted as prescribed for new ships, including the procedures described in section 6 and 7 of these Guidelines. Alternatively the procedures described in subsection 4.2 may be applied for existing ships, but these procedures should not be used for any new installation resulting from the conversion or repair of existing ships after the initial preparation of
the Inventory.

The procedures described in subsection 4.2 should be carried out by the shipowner, who may
draw upon expert assistance. Such an expert or expert party should not be the same as the person
or organization authorized by the Administration to approve the Inventory.
Please refer to appendix 4: “Flow diagram for developing Part I of the Inventory for existing
ships”; and appendix 5: “Typical example of development process for Part I of the Inventory for
existing ships”.

4.2.1 Collection of necessary information (Step 1)

The shipowner should identify, research, request, and procure all reasonably available
documentation regarding the ship. Information that will be useful includes maintenance,
conversion, and repair documents; certificates, manuals, ship’s plans, drawings, and technical
specifications; product information data sheets (such as Material Declarations); and hazardous
material inventories or recycling information from sister ships. Potential sources of information
could include previous shipowners, the ship builder, historical societies, classification society
records, and ship recycling facilities with experience working with similar ships.


4.2.2 Assessment of collected information (Step 2)
The information collected in Step 1 above should be assessed. The assessment should cover all
materials listed in Table A of appendix 1; materials listed in Table B should be listed as far as
practicable. The results of the assessment should be reflected in the visual/sampling check plan.


4.2.3 Preparation of visual/sampling check plan (Step 3)
To specify the materials listed in appendix 1 of these Guidelines a visual/sampling check plan
should be prepared taking into account the collated information and any appropriate expertise.
The visual/sampling check plan based on the following three lists:

  • List of equipment, system and/or area for visual check (any equipment, system
    and/or area specified regarding the presence of the materials listed in appendix 1
    by document analysis should be entered in the List of equipment, system and/or
    area for visual check);

  • List of equipment, system and/or area for sampling check (any equipment, system
    and/or area which cannot be specified regarding the presence of the materials
    listed in appendix 1 by document or visual analysis should be entered in the List
    of equipment, system and/or area as requiring sampling check. A sampling check
    is the taking of samples to identify the presence or absence of Hazardous Material
    contained in the equipment, systems, and/or areas, by suitable and generally
    accepted methods such as laboratory analysis); and

  • List of equipment, system and/or area classed as “potentially containing
    Hazardous Material” (any equipment, system and/or area which cannot be
    specified regarding the presence of the materials listed in appendix 1 by document
    analysis may be entered in the List of equipment, system and/or area classed as
    “potentially containing Hazardous Material” without the sampling check. The
    prerequisite for this classification is a comprehensible justification as to the
    impossibility of conducting sampling without compromising the safety of the ship
    and its operational efficiency).

Visual/sampling checkpoints should be all points where:

  • the presence of materials to be considered for the Inventory Part I as listed in
    appendix 1 is likely;

  • the documentation is not specific; or

  • materials of uncertain composition were used.

4.2.4 Onboard visual/sampling check (Step 4)


The onboard visual/sampling check should be carried out in accordance with the visual/sampling
check plan. When a sampling check is carried out, samples should be taken and the sample
points should be clearly marked on the ship plan and the sample results referenced. Materials of
the same kind may be sampled in a representative manner. Such materials are to be checked to
ensure that they are of the same kind. The sampling check should be carried out drawing upon
expert assistance.


Any uncertainty regarding the presence of Hazardous Materials should be clarified by a
visual/sampling check. Checkpoints should be documented in the ship’s plan and may be
supported by photographs.


If the equipment, system and/or area of the ship are not accessible for a visual check or sampling
check, they should be classified as “potentially containing Hazardous Material”. The prerequisite
for such classification should be the same prerequisite as in section 4.2.3. Any equipment,
system and/or area classed as “potentially containing Hazardous Material” may be investigated or
subjected to a sampling check at the request of the shipowner during a later survey (e.g., during
repair, refit or conversion).


4.2.5 Preparation of Part I of the Inventory and related documentation (Step 5)
If any equipment, system and/or area is classed as either “containing Hazardous Material” or
“potentially containing Hazardous Material”, their approximate quantity and location should be
listed in Part I of the Inventory. These two categories should be indicated separately in the
remarks column of the Inventory of Hazardous Materials.


4.2.6 Diagram of the location of Hazardous Materials on board a ship


Preparation of a diagram showing the location of the materials listed in Table A is recommended
in order to help Ship Recycling Facilities gain a visual understanding of the Inventory.


4.3 Maintaining and updating Part I of the Inventory during operations


4.3.1 Part I of the Inventory should be appropriately maintained and updated, especially after
any repair or conversion or sale of a ship.


4.3.2 Updating of Part I of the Inventory in the event of new installation


If any machinery or equipment is added to, removed or replaced or the hull coating is renewed,
Part I of the Inventory should be updated according to the requirements for new ships as
stipulated in subsections 4.1.2 to 4.1.4. Updating is not required if identical parts or coatings are
installed or applied.

4.3.3 Continuity of Part I of the Inventory
Part I of the Inventory should belong to the ship and the continuity and conformity of the
information it contains should be confirmed, especially if the flag, owner or operator of the ship
changes.


4.4 Development of Part II of the Inventory (operationally generated waste)


4.4.1 Once the decision to recycle a ship has been taken, Part II of the Inventory should be developed before the final survey, taking into account that a ship destined to be recycled shall conduct operations in the period prior to entering the Ship Recycling Facility in a manner that minimizes the amount of cargo residues, fuel oil and wastes remaining on board (regulation 8.2).


4.4.2 Operationally generated wastes to be listed in the Inventory
If the wastes listed in Part II of the Inventory provided in “Table C (Potentially hazardous items)” of appendix 1 are intended for delivery with the ship to a Ship Recycling Facility, the quantity of the operationally generated wastes should be estimated and their approximate quantities and locations should be listed in Part II of the Inventory.


4.5 Development of Part III of the Inventory (stores)


4.5.1 Once the decision to recycle has been taken, Part III of the Inventory should be developed before the final survey, taking into account the fact that a ship destined to be recycled shall minimize the wastes remaining on board (regulation 8.2). Each item listed in Part III should correspond to the ship’s operations during its last voyage.


4.5.2 Stores to be listed in the Inventory
If the stores to be listed in Part III of the Inventory provided in Table C of appendix 1 are to be delivered with the ship to a Ship Recycling Facility, the unit (e.g., capacity of cans and cylinders), quantity and location of the stores should be listed in Part III of the Inventory.


4.5.3 Liquids and gases sealed in ship’s machinery and equipment to be listed in the Inventory
If any liquids and gases listed in Table C of appendix 1 are integral in machinery and equipment on board a ship, their approximate quantity and location should be listed in Part III of the Inventory. However, small amounts of lubricating oil, anti-seize compounds and grease which are applied to or injected into machinery and equipment to maintain normal performance do not fall within the scope of this provision. For subsequent completion of Part III of the Inventory during the recycling preparation processes, the quantity of liquids and gases listed in Table C of appendix 1 required for normal operation, including the related pipe system volumes, should be prepared and documented at the design and construction stage. This information belongs to the ship, and continuity of this information should be maintained if the flag, owner or operator of the ship changes.


4.5.4 Regular consumable goods to be listed in the Inventory
Regular consumable goods, as provided in Table D of appendix 1should not be listed in Part I or Part II but should be listed in Part III of the Inventory if they are to be delivered with the ship to a Ship Recycling Facility. A general description including the name of item (e.g., TV set),
manufacturer, quantity and location should be entered in Part III of the Inventory. The check on materials provided for in paragraphs 4.1.2 and 4.1.3 of the Guidelines does not apply to regular consumable goods.


4.6 Description of location of Hazardous Materials on board
The locations of Hazardous Materials on board should be described and identified using the name of location (e.g., second floor of Engine-room, Bridge DK, APT, No.1 Cargo Tank, Frame number) given in the plans (e.g., General Arrangement, Fire and Safety Plan, Machinery Arrangement or Tank Arrangement).

4.7 Description of approximate quantity of Hazardous Materials
In order to identify the approximate quantity of Hazardous Materials, the standard unit used for the of Hazardous Materials should be kg, unless other units (e.g., m3 for materials of liquid or gases, m2 for materials used in floors or walls) are considered more appropriate. An approximate quantity should be rounded up to at least two significant figures.

05 Requirements for ascertaining the confirmity of the Inventory

5 Requirements for ascertaining the conformity of the Inventory


5.1 Design and construction stage


The conformity of Part I of the Inventory at the design and construction stage should be ascertained by reference to the collected “Supplier’s Declaration of Conformity” described in section 7 and the related “Material Declarations” collected from suppliers.


5.2 Operational stage

Shipowners should implement the following measures in order to ensure the conformity of Part I
of the Inventory:

  1. designate a person as responsible for maintaining and updating the Inventory (the designated person may be employed ashore or on board);
  2. the designated person, in order to implement subsection 4.3.2, should establish and supervise a system to ensure the necessary updating of the Inventory in the event of new installation;
  3. to maintain the Inventory including dates of changes or new deleted entries and the signature of the designated person; and
  4. provide related documents as required for the survey or sale of the ship

06 Material declaration

6 Material Declaration


6.1 General


Suppliers to the shipbuilding industry should identify and declare whether or not the materials listed in Table A or Table B are present above the threshold level specified in appendix 1 of these Guidelines. However, this provision does not apply to chemicals which do not constitute a part of the finished product.


6.2 Information required in the declaration


At a minimum the following information is required in the Material Declaration:

  1. date of declaration;
  2. Material Declaration identification number;
  3. supplier’s name;
  4. product name (common product name or name used by manufacturer);
  5. product number (for identification by manufacturer);
  6. declaration of whether or not the materials listed in Table A and Table B of appendix 1 of these Guidelines are present in the product above the threshold level stipulated in appendix 1 of these Guidelines; and
  7. mass of each constituent material listed in Table A and/or Table B of appendix 1 of these Guidelines if present above threshold level.

An example of a Material Declaration is shown in appendix 6.

07 Supplier's declaration of conformity

7 Supplier’s Declaration of Conformity


7.1 Purpose and scope


The purpose of the Supplier’s Declaration of Conformity is to provide assurance that the related Material Declaration conforms to section 6.2, and to identify the responsible entity.

The Supplier’s Declaration of Conformity remains valid as long as the products are present on board.

The supplier compiling the Supplier’s Declaration of Conformity should establish a company policy1. The company policy on the management of the chemical substances in products which the supplier manufactures or sells should cover:


  1. Compliance with law:
    The regulations and requirements governing the management of chemical substances in products should be clearly described in documents which should be kept and maintained; and
  2. Obtaining of information on chemical substance content:
    In procuring raw materials for components and products, suppliers should be selected following an evaluation, and the information on the chemical substances they supply should be obtained.


(1) A recognized quality management system may be utilized.


7.2 Contents and format


The Supplier’s Declaration of Conformity should contain the following:

  1. unique identification number;
  2. name and contact address of the issuer;
  3. identification of the subject of the Declaration of Conformity (e.g., name, type, model number, and/or other relevant supplementary information);
  4. statement of conformity;
  5. date and place of issue; and
  6. signature (or equivalent sign of validation), name and function of the authorized person(s) acting on behalf of the issuer.

An example of the Supplier’s Declaration of Conformity is shown in appendix 7.


1A recognized quality management system may be utilized.

08 List of appendices

8 List of appendices


Appendix 1: Items to be listed in the Inventory of Hazardous Materials

Appendix 2: Standard format of the Inventory of Hazardous Materials

Appendix 3: Example of the development process for Part I of the Inventory for new ships

Appendix 4: Flow diagram for developing Part I of the Inventory for existing ships

Appendix 5: Example of the development process for Part I of the Inventory for existing ships

Appendix 6: Form of Material Declaration

Appendix 7: Form of Supplier’s Declaration of Conformity

Appendix 8: Examples of Table A and Table B materials of appendix 1 with CAS-numbers

 

 

Appendix 01 Items to be listed in the inventory of hazardous materials

Items to be listed in the inventory of hazardous materials

TABLE A* Materials listed in appendix 1 of the Annex to the Convention

 

TABLE B* Materials listed in appendix 2 of the Annex to the Convention

 

TABLE C Potentially hazardous items

TABLE C Potentially hazardous items

2) Definition of garbage is identical to that in MARPOL Annex V. However, incinerator ash is classified separately because it may include hazardous substances or heavy metals.

TABLE D** Regular consumable goods potentially containing Hazardous Materials


*For materials in this Table with no threshold level, quantities occurring as unintentional trace contaminants should not be listed in Material Declarations and in the Inventory.

** This Table does not include ship specific equipment integral to ship operations, which has to be listed in Part I of the Inventory.

Appendix 02 Standard format of the inventory of hazardous materials

Part I Hazardous materials contained in tyhe ship's structure and equipment


I-1 Paints and coating systems containing materials listed in Table A and Table B of appendix 1 of the Guidelines

I-2 Equipment and machinery containing materials listed in Table A and Table B of appendix 1 of the Guidelines

I-3 Structure and hull containing materials listed in Table A and Table B of appendix 1 of the Guidelines

Part II OPERATIONALLY GENERATED WASTE

Part III STORES

III-1 Stores

III-2 Liquids sealed in ship’s machinery and equipment

III-3 Gases sealed in ship’s machinery and equipment

III-4 Regular consumable goods potentially containing Hazardous Materials


1The location of a Part II or Part III item should be entered in order based on its location, from a lower level to an upper level and from a fore part to an aft part. The location of Part I items is recommended to be described similarly, as far as practicable.

2In column “Remarks” for Part III items, if Hazardous Materials are integrated in products, the approximate amount of the contents should be shown as far as possible.

Appendix 03 Example of the development process new ships

Examples of the development process for part I of the inventory for new ships

1 Objective of the typical example


This example has been developed to give guidance and to facilitate understanding of the development process for Part I of the Inventory of Hazardous Materials for new ships.


2 Development flow for Part I of the Inventory


Part I of the Inventory should be developed using the following 3 steps. However, the order of these steps is flexible and can be changed depending on the schedule of shipbuilding:

  1. collection of Hazardous Materials information;
  2. utilization of Hazardous Materials information; and
  3. preparation of the Inventory (by filling out standard format).

3 Collection of Hazardous Materials information


3.1 Data collection process for Hazardous Materials


Materials Declaration (MD) and Supplier’s Declaration of Conformity (SDoC) for products from suppliers (tier 1 suppliers) should be requested and collected by the shipbuilding yard. Tier 1 suppliers may request from their suppliers (tier 2 suppliers) the relevant information if they cannot develop the MD based on the information available. Thus the collection of data on Hazardous Materials may involve the entire shipbuilding supply chain (Figure 1).

Figure 1 – Process of MD (and SDoC) collection showing involvement of supply chain

 

3.2 Declaration of Hazardous Materials


Suppliers should declare whether or not the Hazardous Materials listed in Table A and Table B in the MD are present in concentrations above the threshold levels specified for each “homogeneous material” in a product.


3.2.1 Materials listed in Table A


If one or more materials listed in Table A are found to be present in concentrations above the specified threshold level according to the MD, the products which contain these materials shall not be installed on a ship. However, if the materials are used in a product in accordance with an exemption specified by the Convention (e.g., new installations containing hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) before 1 January 2020), the product should be listed in the Inventory.


3.2.2 Materials listed in Table B


If one or more materials listed in Table B are found to be present in concentrations above the specified threshold level according to the MD, the products should be listed in the Inventory.


3.3 Example of “Homogeneous Materials”


Figure 2 shows an example of four homogeneous materials which constitute a cable. In this


4 Utilization of Hazardous Materials information


Products which contain Hazardous Materials in concentrations above the specified threshold levels should be clearly identified in the MD. The approximate quantity of the Hazardous Materials should be calculated if the mass data for Hazardous Materials are declared in the MD using a unit which cannot be directly utilized in the Inventory.


5 Preparation of Inventory (by filling out standard format)


The information received for the Inventory, as contained in Table A and Table B of appendix 1of these Guidelines, ought to be structured and utilized according to the following categorization for
Part I of the Inventory:

1.1 Paints and coating systems;
1.2 Equipment and machinery; and
1.3 Structure and hull.

5.1 “Name of equipment and machinery” column


5.1.1 Equipment and machinery


The name of each equipment or machinery should be entered in this column. If more than one Hazardous Material is present in the equipment or machinery, the row relating to that equipment or machinery should be appropriately divided such that all of the Hazardous Materials contained in the piece of equipment or machinery are entered. If more than one item of equipment or machinery is situated in one location, both name and quantity of the equipment or machinery should be entered in the column. For identical common or mass-produced items, such as bolts, nuts and valves, there is no need to list each item individually. An example is shown in Table 1.

Table 1 – Example showing more than one item of equipment or machinery situated in one location

 

5.1.2 Pipes and cables


The names of pipes and of systems, including electric cables, which are often situated in more than one compartment of a ship, should be described using the name of the system concerned. A reference to the compartments where these systems are located is not necessary as long as the system is clearly identified and properly named.

5.2 “Approximate quantity” column


The standard unit for approximate quantity of solid Hazardous Materials should be kg. If the Hazardous Materials are liquids or gases, the standard unit should be either m3 or kg. An approximate quantity should be rounded up to at least two significant figures. If the Hazardous Material is less than 10 g, the description of the quantity should read “<0.01 kg”.

Table 2 – Example of a switchboard

5.3 “Location” column


5.3.1 Example of a location list


It is recommended to prepare a location list which covers all compartments of a ship based on the ship’s plans (e.g., General Arrangement, Engine-room Arrangement, Accommodation and Tank Plan) and on other documentation on board, including certificates or spare parts’ lists. The description of the location should be based on a location such as a deck or room to enable easy identification. The name of the location should correspond to the ship’s plans so as to ensure consistency between the Inventory and the ship’s plans. Examples of names of locations are shown in Table 3.

Table 3 – Examples of location names

5.3.2 Description of location of pipes and electrical systems


Locations of pipes and systems, including electrical systems and cables situated in more than one compartment of a ship, should be described for each system concerned. If they are situated in a number of compartments, the most practical of the following two options should be used:

  1. listing of all components in the column; or
  2. description of the location of the system using an expression such as those shown under “primary classification” and “secondary classification” in Table 3.

A typical description of a pipe system is shown in Table 4.

Table 4 – Example of description of a pipe system

Appendix 04 FLOW DIAGRAM FOR DEVELOPING PART I OF THE Inventory for existing ships

Flow diagram for developing part 1 of the inventory for existing ships

Appendix 05 Example existing ships

Example of the development process for part 1 of the inventory for existing ships

1 Introduction

In order to develop Part I of the Inventory of Hazardous Materials for existing ships, documents of the individual ship as well as the knowledge and experience of specialist personnel (experts) is required. An example of the development process for Part I of the Inventory of Hazardous Materials for existing ships is useful to understand the basic steps as laid out in the Guidelines and to ensure a unified application. However, attention should be paid to variations in different
types of ships1.

Compilation of Part I of the Inventory of Hazardous Material for existing ships involves the following 6 steps which are described in paragraph 4.2 and appendix 4 of these Guidelines.

Step 1: Collection of necessary information;
Step 2: Assessment of collected information;
Step 3: Preparation of visual/sampling check plan;
Step 4: Onboard visual/sampling check; and
Step 5: Preparation of Part I of the Inventory and related documentation.

1) The example of a 28,000 gross tonnage bulk carrier constructed in 1985 is used in this appendix.

2 Step 1: Collection of necessary information


2.1 Sighting of available documents

A practical first step is to collect detailed documents for the ship. The shipowner should try to collate documents normally retained onboard the ship or by the shipping company as well as relevant documents that the shipyard, manufacturers, or classification society may have. The following documents should be used when available:

Ship’s specification
General Arrangement
Machinery Arrangement
Spare Parts and Tools List
Piping Arrangement
Accommodation Plan
Fire Control Plan
Fire Protection Plan
Insulation Plan (Hull and Machinery)
International Anti-Fouling System Certificate
Related manuals and drawings
Information from other inventories and/or sister or similar ships, machinery, equipment, materials and coatings
Results of previous visual/sampling checks and other analysis

If the ship has undergone conversions or major repair work, it is necessary to identify as far as possible the modifications from the initial design and specification of the ship


2.2 Indicative list

It is impossible to check all equipment, systems, and/or areas on board the ship to determine the presence or absence of Hazardous Materials. The total number of parts on board may exceed several thousand. In order to take a practical approach, an “Indicative list” should be prepared that identifies the equipment, system, and/or area on board that is presumed to contain Hazardous Materials. Field interviews with the shipyard and suppliers may be necessary to prepare such lists. A typical example of an “Indicative list” is shown below:

2.2.1 Materials to be checked and documented
Hazardous Materials, as identified in appendix 1 of these Guidelines, should be listed in Part I of the Inventory for existing ships. Appendix 1 of the Guidelines contains all the materials concerned. Table A shows those which are required to be listed and Table B shows those which should be listed as far as practical.

2.2.2 Materials listed in Table A

Table A lists the following four materials:

Asbestos
Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)
Ozone depleting substances
Anti-fouling systems containing organotin compounds as a biocide


2.2.2.1 Asbestos

Field interviews were conducted with over 200 Japanese shipyards and suppliers regarding the use of asbestos in production. “Indicative lists” for asbestos developed on the basis of this research are shown below:

2.2.2.2 Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCBs)

Worldwide restriction of PCBs began on 17 May 2004 as a result of the implementation of the Stockholm Convention, which aims to eliminate or restrict the production and use of persistent organic pollutants. In Japan, domestic control began in 1973, with the prohibition of all activities relating to the production, use and import of PCBs. Japanese suppliers can provide accurate information concerning their products. The “Indicative list” of PCBs has been developed as shown below:

2.2.2.3 Ozone depleting substances

The “Indicative list” for Ozone depleting substances is shown below. Ozone depleting substances have been controlled according to the Montreal Protocol and MARPOL Convention. Although almost all substances have been banned since 1996, HCFC can still be used until 2020.

2.2.2.4 Organotin compounds

Organotin compounds include Tributyl tins (TBT), Triphenyl tins (TPT) and Tributyl tin oxide (TBTO). Organotin compounds have been used as anti-fouling paint on ships’ bottoms and the International Convention on the Control of Harmful Anti-Fouling Systems on Ships (AFS Convention) stipulates that all ships shall not apply or re-apply organotin compounds after 1 January 2003, and that, after 1 January 2008, all ships shall either not bear such compounds on their hulls or shall bear a coating that forms a barrier preventing such compounds from leaching into the sea. The above-mentioned dates may have been extended by permission of the Administration bearing in mind that the AFS Convention entered into force on 17 September 2008.

2.2.3 Materials listed in Table B

For existing ships it is not obligatory for materials listed in Table B to be listed in Part I of the Inventory. However, if they can be identified in a practical way, they should be listed in the Inventory, because the information will be used to support ship recycling processes. The Indicative list of materials listed in Table B is shown below:

3 Step 2: Assessment of collected information

Preparation of a checklist is an efficient method for developing the Inventory for existing ships in order to clarify the results of each step. Based on collected information including the “Indicative list” mentioned in Step 1, all equipment, systems, and/or areas onboard assumed to contain Hazardous Materials listed in Tables A and B should be included in the checklist. Each listed equipment, system, and/or area on board should be analysed and assessed for its Hazardous
Materials content.


The existence and volume of Hazardous Materials may be judged and calculated from the Spare parts and tools list and the Maker’s drawings. The existence of asbestos contained in floors, ceilings and walls may be identified from Fire Protection Plans, while the existence of TBT in coatings can be identified from the International Anti-Fouling System Certificate, Coating scheme and the History of Paint.

When a component or coating is determined to contain Hazardous Materials, a “Y” should be entered in the column for “Result of document analysis” in the checklist, to denote “Contained”. Likewise, when an item is determined not to contain Hazardous Materials, the entry “N” should be made in the column to denote “Not contained”. When a determination cannot be made as to the Hazardous Materials content, the column should be completed with the entry “Unknown”.

Checklist (Step 2)

4 Step 3: Preparation of visual/sampling check plan

Each item classified as “Contained” or “Not contained” in Step 2 should be subjected to a visual check on board, and the entry “V” should be made in the “Check procedure” column to denote “Visual check”.

For each item categorized as “unknown”, a decision should be made as to whether to apply a sampling check. However, any item categorized as “unknown” may be classed as “potentially containing Hazardous Material” provided comprehensive justification is given, or if it can be assumed that there will be little or no effect on disassembly as a unit and later ship recycling and disposal operations. For example, in the following checklist, in order to carry out a sampling
check for “Packing with aux. boiler” the shipowner needs to disassemble the auxiliary boiler in a repair yard. The costs of this check are significantly higher than the later disposal costs at a Ship Recycling Facility. In this case, therefore, the classification as “potentially containing Hazardous Material” is justifiable.

Checklist (Step 3)

Before any visual/sampling check on board is conducted, a “visual/sampling check plan” should be prepared. An example of such a plan is shown below.

To prevent any incidents during the visual/sampling check, a schedule should be established to eliminate interference with other ongoing work on board. To prevent potential exposure to Hazardous Materials during the visual/sampling check, safety precautions should be in place on board. For example, sampling of potential asbestos containing materials could release fibres into the atmosphere. Therefore, appropriate personnel safety and containment procedures should be implemented prior to sampling.


Items listed in the visual/sampling check should be arranged in sequence so that the onboard check is conducted in a structured manner (e.g., from a lower level to an upper level and from a fore part to an aft part).

This plan is established in accordance with the Guidelines for the development of the Inventory of Hazardous Materials

5 Step 4: Onboard visual/sampling check

The visual/sampling check should be conducted according to the plan. Check points should be marked in the ship’s plan or recorded with photographs.

A person taking samples should be protected by the appropriate safety equipment relevant to the suspected type of hazardous materials encountered. Appropriate safety precautions should also be in place for passengers, crewmembers and other persons on board, to minimize the potential exposure to hazardous materials. Safety precautions could include the posting of signs or other verbal or written notification for personnel to avoid such areas during sampling. The personnel taking samples should ensure compliance with relevant national regulations.

The results of visual/sampling checks should be recorded in the checklist. Any equipment, systems and/or areas of the ship that cannot be accessed for checks should be classified as “potentially containing Hazardous Material”. In this case, the entry in the “Result of check” column should be “PCHM”.


6 Step 5: Preparation of Part I of the Inventory and related documentation

6.1 Development of Part I of the Inventory

The results of the check and the estimated quantity of Hazardous Materials should be recorded on the checklist. Part I of the Inventory should be developed with reference to the checklist.

6.2 Development of location diagram of Hazardous Materials


With respect to Part I of the Inventory, the development of a location diagram of Hazardous Materials is recommended in order to help the Ship Recycling Facility gain a visual understanding of the Inventory.

Example of the Inventory for existing ships

Inventory of Hazardous Materials for “Sample Ship”

Particulars of the “Sample Ship” 

Distinctive number or lettersXXXXNNN
Port of registryPort of World
Type of vesselBulk carrier
Gross Tonnage28,000 GT
IMO number
Name of shipbuilder
NNNNNNN
xx Shipbuilding Co. Ltd
Name of shipowneryy Maritime SA
Date of deliveryMM/DD/1988

This inventory was developed in accordance with the Guidelines for the development of the Inventory of Hazardous Materials.


Attachment:
1: Inventory of Hazardous Materials
2: Assessment of collected information
3: Location diagram of Hazardous Materials

Inventory of Hazardous Materials : “Sample Ship”

Part I HAZARDOUS MATERIALS CONTAINED IN THE SHIP’S STRUCTURE AND EQUIPMENT

*1 Each item should be entered in order based on its location, from a lower level to an upper level and from a fore part to an aft part.

Example of location diagram of Hazardous Materials

 


1The example of a 28,000 gross tonnage bulk carrier constructed in 1985 is used in this appendix.
Appendix 06 Form of material declaration

Form of material declaration

Appendix 07 Form of supplier's declaration conformity

Form of supplier's declaration of conformity

 

Appendix 08 Examples table A and B materials Appendix 1

Examples of table A and table B materials of Appendix 1 with CAS numbers

*This list is developed with reference to Joint Industry Guide No.101.
*This list is not exhaustive; it represents examples of chemicals with known CAS numbers and may require periodical updating.

 

*This list is developed with reference to Joint Industry Guide No.101.
*This list is not exhaustive; it represents examples of chemicals with known CAS numbers and may require periodical updating.


*This list is developed with reference to Joint Industry Guide No.101.
*This list is not exhaustive; it represents examples of chemicals with known CAS numbers and may require periodical updating.



*This list is developed with reference to Joint Industry Guide No.101.
*This list is not exhaustive; it represents examples of chemicals with known CAS numbers and may require periodical updating.

*This list is developed with reference to Joint Industry Guide No.101.
*This list is not exhaustive; it represents examples of chemicals with known CAS numbers and may require periodical updating.



Annex 03 Statement Hong Kong convention

Statement by friends of the Earth International concerning the adoption of the Hong Kong Convention

In May in Hong Kong, FOEI was present at the adoption of the IMO Convention on Ship Recycling with many of our colleagues representing several environmental and human rights organisations – all members of the NGO Platform on Shipbreaking. Several were from Bangladesh, representing Bangladesh Supreme Court environmental lawyers, trade unions and activists working on the ground in Chittagong. At the Hong Kong Conference we uttered profound disappointment with the adopted Convention because we believe it will fail to fulfil its mandate, namely “generate real changes in the conditions under which end-of-life ships are dismantled so as to protect workers and the environment from the adverse impacts of hazardous waste and dangerous working practices”. With no economic incentive to push liability upstream to the polluters; no mandatory third party auditing of ship recycling facilities; and not even condemning the most unacceptable practice of shipbreaking – the beaching method – the IMO will not reverse current practice of unsafe and polluting shipbreaking.

Since May at least three workers have died on shipbreaking yards; one in India; two in Bangladesh – and a little more than a week ago we received further disturbing news from Chittagong: as reported in the Daily Star and many other Bangladeshi newspapers, 2 weeks ago more than 15,000 mangrove trees were cut on this Bangladeshi beach to make room for an additional five shipbreaking yards. This is an environmental disaster for the local community, only weeks before the cyclone and monsoon season. This forest, which would have protected Bangladesh against the threats of climate change – flooding and erosion – has now been destroyed.

This development shows that current practices will not change, therefore we urge the Correspondence Group on Guidelines for Ship Recycling to take this development into consideration when discussing the Guidelines for ship recycling facilities. And lastly, we ask that this intervention be attached to the final report of MEPC 59.

Annex 04 Statement Canada on proposal North American emission

Statement by the delegation of  Canada on the proposal of the NOorth American emission control area and Canada's ratification of Marpol Annex VI

“Canada fully endorses the proposal to designate an Emission Control Area for nitrogen oxides,
sulphur oxides and particulate matter, in United States and Canadian waters.

Canada and the United States have coordinated this proposal, in line with our common interests,
shared geography and interrelated economies. Our joint submittal, in MEPC 59/6/5, addresses each
of the criteria required by Appendix III to MARPOL Annex VI.

Ships are significant contributors to adverse air quality in the United States and Canada. Improving
ship emissions to Emission Control Area standards in these areas will yield substantial health and
environmental benefits in Canada and the United States.

Significant improvements are also expected for sensitive ecosystems that are damaged by ship
emissions.

The costs of implementing and complying with the proposed Emission Control Area are expected to
be small, both absolutely, and compared to the costs of achieving similar emission reductions
through additional controls on land-based sources.

We invite the Committee to review this proposal with a view toward approving the proposed
Emission Control Area for adoption at MEPC 60.

In light of the proposed Emission Control Area, there have been questions regarding Canada’s
progress with regard to MARPOL Annex VI. Canada would like to report on the progress we are
making in this regard.

The Government of Canada has a policy to consult Canada’s elected national legislative body, the
House of Commons, regarding the ratification of treaties and conventions. This is similar to
procedures used historically in the United Kingdom and Australia.

The Government observes a waiting period of 21 sitting days for consultation before taking any
action to bring that convention into effect. Canada intends to table this Convention with Canada’s
Parliament on 14 September 2009.

This process would apply to Canada’s ratification of Annexes IV, V and VI to the International
Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships and other maritime conventions, including the
Anti-fouling Systems Convention.

Canada currently has legislation and regulations in place to implement the current Annex VI, and
these other instruments.

Canada is continuing its work towards ratifying MARPOL Annex VI to be a full partner with the
United States for the proposed Emission Control Area.

Significant work has been achieved by Canada to advance and promote conformity with international instruments in its regulatory system.

The Government of Canada is expected to announce further progress this fall after consultation with Parliament with a view towards ratification of MARPOL Annex VI and other conventions.”

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